Tally's Corner Revisited

A Half-Century of Change in African-American Washington and Beyond

The Department of Sociology invites you and the GW community to Tally's Corner Revisited, a symposium commemorating the 50th anniversary of the publication of GW alumnus Elliot Liebow's classic ethnography of African-American street-corner men in DC, Tally's Corner. 

Liebow's mid-1960's study of life in a segregated neighborhood of old row houses, tenements, and liquor stores critiqued the widspread "culture of poverty" thesis and conveyed the lives of inner-city African-Americans from their own perspectives just as urban disorders were erupting across the nation. The book became an instant classic in sociology, inspiring many street-corner ethnographies in the decades to follow.  Half a century later, after the Tally's Corner neighborhood was bulldozed and gentrified into what is considered the edge of the hip Shaw area, scholars and activists will use the occasion to reflect on the book’s long-term impact and on what has changed – or not - in terms of racial inequality in Washington and other American cities.

The keynote lecture, "Tally's Corner, 50 years later: Same Corner, Different Conditions, Different Corner, Same Conditions," will be delivered by Professor Maurice Jackson (History and African American Studies, Georgetown University). His next book is titled, Halfway to Freedon: The Struggles and Strivings of African American in Washington, DC.


We hope you can join us on campus for this engaging and informative discussion. We ask that you please register your attendance.

REGISTER


Speakers include:

Elijah Anderson is the William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Sociology at Yale University.

Michelle Coghill Chatmam is Assistant Professor in the Crime, Justice, and Security Studies program at her alma mater, The University of the Districy of Columbia (UDC).

Mitchell Duneier is currently Chair and Professor of Sociology at Princeton University and regular Visiting Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Derek Hyra is an associate professor in the School of Public Affairs at American University and the Founding Director of the Metropolitan Policy Center at American University.

Dominic Moulden is the Resource Organizer for Organizing Neighborhood Equity (ONE DC) in Washington, D.C.

Parisa B. Norouzi is the Executive Director of Empower DC in Washington, D.C.

Hilary Silver, moderator, is Chair and Professor, Department of Sociology and Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Aministration at George Washington University.

William Sprigg is a Professor in the Department of Economics at Howard University and Chief Economist at AFL-CIO.

Gregory Squires, moderator, is a Professor in the Department of Sociology and Trachtenberg School of Public Policy & Public Administration at George Washington University.

Sponsored By:


Department of Sociology at George Washington University


With the support of:

The Catholic University of America

Center for Washington Area Studies at George Washington University

The College of Professional Studies

The Honey W. Nashman Center for Civic Engagement and Public Servic